Ugly Talk Episode 15 – Twin Peaks and MICE Quotient

Hello internet!  This is a crosspost from our sister show Ugly Talk!  If you like this episode, be sure to check out the site and listen to the rest, or subscribe via your podcatcher of choice.

Twin Peaks was a TV series by David Lynch and Mark Frost about the murder of the Homecoming Queen Laura Palmer in the sleepy town of Twin Peaks, Washington.  We share the experiences and explore the town through Dale Cooper, a federal agent called in to investigate the murder.

The M.I.C.E. quotient is a writing foundation credited to Orson Scott Card, known most notably for his science fiction series Ender’s Game.  The basic idea as listed in the acronym is that every story seed falls into the categories of milieu, idea, character, or event.  You will have many of these story ideas overlapping and building upon one another in the course of your story, but the important thing is that you resolve them in the reverse of the order you introduce them.

The structure of the early episodes and the subsequent failure of Twin Peaks can be heavily traced to MICE (among other things), and in this episode, we will discuss MICE through Twin Peaks, and how you can apply it to your own writing.

Media Discussed in this Episode:

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2 Comments

  1. Darth Skeletor
    Posted July 5, 2017 at 3:41 pm | Permalink

    So I’ve only seen the original series on NetFlix, neither of the movies or the new stuff. Do I need to beware spoilers or am I good?

    • drunkandugly
      Posted July 5, 2017 at 3:46 pm | Permalink

      We don’t say much about the movies or the new series (at the time of recording there wasn’t enough about the new series to really discuss). The MICE discussion is largely about the structure of the main series.

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